Tuesday, April 7, 2015

There is a best selling book by Robert Fulghum 

titled All I Really Need to Know I Learned in 

Kindergarten.    Here are some of his ideas:

1. Share everything.

 
2. Play fair.


3. Don't hit people.


4. Put things back where you found them.


5. CLEAN UP YOUR OWN MESS.


You can see how those things can really apply to us no matter how old we are!

Think about your own early years in school, what did 
 
you learn that you think can still apply to your life? 
 
Is there a teacher who really taught you some 
 
wonderful lesson? Is there a particular incident you 
 
felt you really learned from? Is there a book your 
 
teacher shared that you really connected with?

33 comments:

  1. In my early years of school, I learned that you should always be kind to people, no matter what. This still applies to my life because in order to make new friends, you have to be kind to people. In first grade, my teacher read a book called Filling Someone’s Bucket. The book said that each person carries an invisible bucket with them. When the bucket is full, that person is happy. When the bucket is empty, the person is sad. The book taught me to fill, not empty other people’s buckets.

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  2. In my early years of school, I learned many things that still apply to me in life. I remember in 2nd grade, I told a story that I shouldn’t have because the person the story was about wanted to tell it. The kid cried and cried and Mrs. Miller told me this rule I won’t forget. She told me not to tell a story that wasn’t mine. In 5th grade, I have to make sure I don’t tell my friends a secret that I have kept that would make people really mean to a person. It’s not my story so I won’t tell it is what I always say when somebody asks about something that isn’t my story.

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  3. One thing that I learned in kindergarten was that there is humor in all things. My awesome teacher, Mrs. Black, was counting how many people there were in the line in to recess to see that we were all there, and I was number 20. Instead of saying 20, though, she said twentyteen! There’s even humor in math. My brother makes a lot of puns from regular talking. We can be talking about our dog and how he never eats his dog food and he makes some pun about collars or something! I think it’s creative. My family always is funny, and in kindergarten, I learned either how or why, or I think I might have learned what.

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  4. One lesson I learned that could still be useful today is “Lying doesn't get you anywhere in life.” One reason why this could still be useful is because I used to lie about tons of things, and that never got me anywhere. It just got me in trouble. Now, I never lie about anything, so if my parents ask me a simple question, I can answer it honestly and I know I won’t get in trouble. One incident I could learn from is when I used to be scared of the deep end at the pool. One of my instructors threw me in there, and I stayed at the top of the water, and I didn't sink. Now, I love doing flips and i’m not afraid to go off the diving board at the pool, and now I know that you don’t know you don’t/do like it if you don’t try it.

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  5. I learned a lot of things from my early years in Kindergarten. Maybe for example to share with other people and include other kids. Also not to hurt other kids feelings. But if I had to choose one incident that I could really learn from is one that happened right here in school. One time I had said something to someone (not saying names) and I could tell I had made him feel terribly bad. This really struck me on how he had reacted. I didn't think I could hurt someone that much but I learned that I just have to accept people for who they are. Also, a book I can really connect with is ¨Out of My Mind¨ by Sharon M. Draper. It's not that I am disabled or anything but it is to be treating everybody like they are fighting a tough battle because we all are at some point in our lives. If we treat people rude, then they will be even more hurt than they are. You never know what is happening in everyone's personal life.

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  6. In kindergarten I learned how to do an "I" statement. An I statement is a way to tell people you don't like what they are doing and to tell them to stop in a nice way. This will be very useful for the rest of my life.
    I have learned many things from many teachers and I can't single one out as one who taught me something important because all 20 of them have taught me many useful things in life.
    I really learned from the time in church when we had a lesson about our words. My teacher had us squeeze all the toothpaste out of a tube. The toothpaste going out resembled us saying hurtful words to someone. Then she had us try to put all the words back in the tube. No one could do it. This symbolized that once you say something you can never, ever get it back no matter how much you try.

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  7. In my early years as a Kindergartner, I learned some wonderful things that will always go on into my life. I learned that If you are nice to people, than they will trust you better and you can trust yourself better too. This is one of the most important lessons because if you or people don't trust you, you aren't happy. If people trust you, you will have a better attitude about yourself. Mrs. Lerner in 2nd grade was a teacher that taught me a lot. She always made sure that you would try your best at everything. She was fun! One book that I really connected with was a book called Cat in the Hat. The book was so funny and it told me to always clean up the mess you made. Or else you will get in trouble.

    ~Randy =D

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  8. When I was younger a movie taught me a very valuable lesson. In the movie Mulan the father tells her that “The flower that blooms in adversity is the most rare and beautiful of all.” This taught me that even if you aren’t like all the other people yet, you still have a chance to shine, and you will shine the brightest. A book taught me another lesson. I still can’t tell if it was good or bad. The quote was, “The more you care, the more you have to lose.” I don’t know whether or not it was good but I really connected with it. In my experience, a lot that I have cared about has been taken. It left a kind of hole. I never really understood this quote until a few years later when I began to realize how cruel the world was.

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  9. Some of the things that I learned from my early years that still apply to my life are:

    1. Share with everyone. If you bring something to a picnic, plan to share it and have enough for everyone. Nobody likes someone that eats food around you when they don’t have some to share.
    2. Always be kind, even if they aren’t kind to you. You never know what someone might be going though. everyone is fighting a battle you know nothing about. Be kind always. Someone might be having a bad day and needs someone to cheer them up.
    3. It’s okay to laugh and have fun, but know when the right times are to do that. You have every right to joke around and have fun, it’s good, even, but you have to know when the right time is.
    4. Be a good sport. Have good sportsmanship, win or lose, and play fair. Don’t cheat, and don’t brag.
    5. Stand up for what is right. Doing what’s right isn’t always easy, but it’s always right! This is very simple. If you do this, it will all turn out alright in the end. Karma will always reward you!

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  10. One rule that I learned at a young age was to include everybody. My teacher had always told me this, but I didn’t really follow it until I got left out. When I asked if I could hang out with somebody, they told me that they could not accept any more people than they already had. I didn’t really get that they were saying no until I started to do homework. I was really upset once I realized that they were excluding me. From then on, I tried my best to figure out a way to include people. To this day, people still ask if they can play with us. I continue to say yes because I don’t want them to feel the same way that I felt when I was younger.

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  11. I learned a lot of things in preschool. 1. control your temper. I felt really mad at the people who were mean, and I felt like I wanted to punch them. I never carried out my treat though. I also learned to pick up after yourself. Back then it was easy, if you are done playing with the play-dough, put it away so it is easier for other kids to get it out. I don't think that there was an incident that changed all my views, but I guess I learned that in Kindergarten, controling your temper and picking up after yourself is good to know for when you are an adult.

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  12. I think that there are some things that apply to us no matter how old we are. Cleaning up your own mess and don't hit people are everyday things that apply. But what about saying your sorry and not hurting others feelings. We don't even think but you might have learned to say sorry in kindergarten but you don't remember. When I was little I learned that if someone hits you, don't hit them back and you always share stuff. I even learned that if someone wants to play with you, you let them. I built a linconlog tower one day and was playing when Reece came down into the basement. I let him play with me and nobody got sad. Ms. Logan helped me a lot with these rules. She made it possible for me to be really good. Without being mean. She helped me learn a lot of those simple rules like not hitting or picking up after yourself. She was a teacher that taught me how to behave right. She mostly did this with notes. If I got a sticker of a smiley face. That was great and she got really happy. And that made me really happy. Ms. Logan taught me a great lesson about how to behave.

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  13. In my early stages of life I learned many things. But one of the things thats stuck to me all of my life that I can still use at any age is to never judge people by the outside. That it doesn't matter if someone has darker skin or likes the same gender. The only way you can judge someone by the content of their attitude, characteristics, and work ethic. Like if you are going down the street and someone is working really hard to repair a bridge and that girl has dark skin. You should automatically judge them by the content of their characteristics. This person is working hard so you should be awed , instead of disgusted..
    I really think my parents wanted me to learn this young because I would use it as soon as possible. My parents are very kind people and they follow this too. But, I think that the hardest thing about this is that people who agree you can’t judge about the appearance of a person just want everyone else to feel that way too. But, not everyone does. It breaks my heart.
    My parents are the best teachers there are. They taught me everything I need to know to be a kind, loving, hard-working, and a leader. They taught me this and I am so glad they did. I know they would be proud to know I have taken this to heart.
    I don’t think there is a particular incident where I have been mean to someone because they have dark skin or they like people with their same gender. Or just anyone who might look or act different. But, I have seen it been be down before. It breaks my heart to know that their are mean people in the world like that.

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  14. These are some of the things that I learned at a younger age that I think can still apply no matter how old you are. First, something that I think can still apply is to always be kind. If everybody just did that when they were told to do and then stopped after they got out of kindergarten/school. Then the world would be full of bullies and other bad people. I also think that that respect is another one. For example, if everyone didn’t respect their elders, then they wouldn’t learn anything that life has taught the elders. Another example is that if nobody respected the government, then that would mean nobody would respect the laws, which would cause chaos in the world. Last, I think that responsibility is important. For instance, if everyone wasn’t responsible, then they wouldn’t clean up after themselves, and that would lead to dog poop everywhere and people’s garbage laying around, and that’s just a few things people would leave around if they weren’t responsible. In conclusion, kindness, respect, and responsibility are three things that I think still apply no matter how old you are.

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  15. I learned multiple things when I was little. First of all, kindness is crucial if you want people to like and be nice to you. I know this applies to life because, well, it’s true! If you go around rejecting, bullying, breaking down people, you’re going to be very lonely in life. I would never want that to happen to me in life, so I try to be kind to everyone and everything. Another thing that I learned when I was younger but in the older grades: work hard, and you will be successful. I know this will pay off because I know if I want a job that will be perfect for me, it won’t just fall into my lap. I have to work for it. Same with school. You won’t get an A+ or a 4 if you just sit there and dilly-dally; you have to put your time and effort into the assignment, especially on tests. I think my fifth grade teacher, Ms. Goutell, really has impacted my life. For example, she sets her expectations high and knows we have the ability to follow them. She has humor at the right time and right places. She believes in us and has really emphasized that working hard will get you somewhere in life. I don’t think there was ever an incident in school that I learned from, and no book that I really, truly connected with.

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  16. One thing that I learned in kindergarten is how to "play fair." Meaning put your best effort into not only doing your work well but not cheating or looking at somebody's paper. One teacher who taught me a life lesson is Ms. Wyman. (AKA Mrs. Potts.) She told me that there was nothing wrong with skipping class or messing around during lessons, as long as you're willing to make it up later. "You cant put it off forever," is how I believe she said it. The book called "Pots" told about a very poor village unable to cooperate. The villagers each only had a couple of ingredient in their houses, and they were not willing to share them. One day the mayor of that village brought out a giant pot and said something like, "Contribute to making a meal in this pot, and you will get your share of the meal. To start of one person put a gallon of water into the pot. Then absolute chaos broke out and everyone was putting food in the pot. This shows that you cannot stand alone and you must help one another to survive.

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  17. Something that I have learned early that I could still use right now is that if you don’t have anything nice to say don’t say anything at all. I think that that is important because if you say something really mean you could make someone feel really bad. Although I learn a lot from teacher’s I do not think that they have taught me something so wonderful that I could use it in any situation. They have taught me how to read and divide fractions though. There isn’t really one time I messed up and that I learned an important lesson from it either. In third grade my teacher Mrs. McCandless told me to read Percy Jackson and it was really good.

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  18. I think the most important lesson I learned in my early years of school is “No Fighting” because I remember always going home upset because people were always saying they're better then me and we would get in a fight about who's better. I wasn't able to live very happy always thinking about who's better. Once I learned the no fighting rule I stopped fighting and was able to live my life happier.

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  19. In my earlier years at school, I learned many things that can still apply to my life now. For example, I learned that you don’t eat glue and you should say you’re sorry even if you aren’t. These rules may seem pretty standard, but do they have a different meaning? The rule for not eating glue can apply to my life now because it can teach me that I need to use my resources for the reasons they are made. If I put shoes on my hands, then I wouldn’t be getting the best use of my shoes, and they wouldn’t be serving a purpose. So, what I mean by this is that you should always use things the way they are intended to be used. Also, I learned to always say sorry, I would, but I usually wouldn’t mean it. This comes into my life now because I will still say sorry when I don’t mean it, because if I’m honest, that could create an enemy. Next, I believe that every teacher that I’ve had has taught their own valuable lesson, based on who you ask. But for me, I can’t decide on a teacher that has taught me a valuable lesson.

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  20. When I think back to my early years of age there is a couple things that still apply to me even now. One of those things is to play fair. I learned from Mr. Troth in P.E. that you have to play fair so others will respect you. He always said to have good sportsmanship if you win a game or if you lose one. Either way you should be fair and honest. Another incident I learned from was in 4th grade when my whole class was outside playing four-square. For some reason we always fought over who got out and how they got out. The lesson we learned from this was that we won’t solve any problems by fighting, but we will if we rock,walk, or talk, the three ways to come up with a solution. What you’d do is rock,paper,scissors with someone and whoever won stayed on, the walking part was just to walk away and forget about it, and the talk part was to talk it out with someone.

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  21. (Continued)The last thing I learned that could still apply now would probably be to not judge a book by its cover. This was something from the book Wonder that my teacher in 4th grade read aloud. Auggie, the main character, was different than the other kids and was judged for the way he looked. On the inside though, Auggie was just a fun-loving person you’d want to be around. Overall, there are still many other rules I could follow now. Remember these three things though, they could very much help you later on in life.

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  22. When I was in my early years of school I learned some things that can still apply to my life. Some of those things where, you should always be safe, never lie, and always be a good sport.
    A book that my teacher, Ms Carroll, read to me called Flying Solo was a book that I really connected with. I really connected to this book because what happened in the book was very similar to what was happening in real life. (I am not going to say what happened in real life, I’m afraid that if I do it will make people sad.)

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  23. One important lesson I learned in my early years at school was to be kind to everybody, even if they aren’t kind back. For example, if there is a person who always bullies you, you could just ignore them and not really care. You shouldn’t be mean to them back because two wrongs don’t make a right. This is important for everyone because in order to make friends and do well in life you need to be kind. I can’t really decide on which important lesson a teacher has taught me because all of my teachers have taught me important lessons. A book I can really connect with is “Out Of My Mind” by Sharon Draper. The theme of the book is about treating everyone equally, which is very important because you can never take back something you’ve said, no matter how hard you try.

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  24. When I was in first grade these kids were talking while the teacher was talking. The person who sat across from me told me to plug my ears so I wouldn't hear them so I did. It worked but the teacher got mad at me because she thought that I wasn't listening to her so I got in trouble for that. This could apply to real life because it will help me remember to always think before I do something. When I was in second grade my Tiquando teacher told me to never give up. I always think of her when I face a challenge.

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  25. One thing I learned in kindergarten was to have good sportsmanship. This applies to not only games but to life. Sure that bad guy stole your wallet and you lost a hundred bucks, but find away to live on. I am glad I learned this because when I was in the lower grades I was a cry baby. My kindergarten teacher and my first and second really implied this until learned it. When ever I lost my friends they would make fun of me. I hate being made fun of more than losing.

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  26. I think I learned quite a few things early on in school. Some things I learned that I think still apply to my life is: share, work hard, clean up after myself, don't tell lies. I don't think any one teacher taught me everything I know. I think each teacher taught a fraction of everything that I know today. One particular incident that I really learned from is : never tell a lie. It is never a good thing, to tell a lie, and usually someone will find out about it and you will be in even more trouble than what you might have been in to begin with. There is not a book or teacher that I really connected with, because as I said, I think each teacher taught an even fraction of everything I know today.

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  27. In my early years of school I learned many lessons. A lesson I think I will keep with me forever is “Think before you speak.” My kindergarten teacher taught me this because I called one of my classmates stupid because she stole my marker. And in kindergarten “stupid” was considered a bad word. So this tells to ask myself, is it necessary to say something mean to someone that did something mean to me? I think that I should take this with me because it is very important to be nice to anyone even if it’s not your best friend. My teacher shared a book with me, his favorite book: Where the Wild Things Are. I like this book because it has a moral- “don’t judge a book by it’s cover”, just because someone doesn’t look nice because they're not pretty, doesn’t mean that they are mean. So you have to really meet the person then you can judge it.

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  28. Some lessons I learned in Kindergarten have helped me as a person through the many years of my life. Such as, don't throw a block at another kids head. Don't judge someone, even if they got a penny stuck in there nose. And, one of the most important, NO-ONE CARES HOW MUCH FOOD YOU CAN EAT IN FIVE MINUTES! My favorite teacher was Mrs. Peterson. She taut me that discriminating was a bad thing, and that it is hard to remove a coin from a kids right nostril. One incident I really learned from is when I was in preschool, we were having a Halloween party. The first thing I saw was that there was a whole lot of food. And let's just say, I mistaken a stick for a gummy worm. So, that taut me that you need to find out more about the food before you start to eat. So, my first three years of school have taut me some good lessons, and I hope that I can remember these lessons.

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  29. Some things that I learned early in the school year that can apply to my life is to treat everyone like you would want to be treated. I think this is very important because if someone is not being nice to you treat them with respect so they treat you with respect. In middle school kids might try and be all cool by being mean to you. You just have to act like you don’t care and say nice things to them. Another thing that I learned was to kill someone with kindness. This rule is similar to the other one because if someone is being mean to you be kind not mean. I learned these two rules because kids in my preschool tried stealing my blueberries. So, I stood up on the table and yelled, “My blueberries, no one touch them!” What I was trying to say was, “Please don’t steal things. Be nice, it isn’t nice to steal.” Later that day I started playing with the kids that stole other kids food. We then agreed that we weren’t going to steal. I think that this probably wasn’t the best thing to do but it worked. Mrs. Logan taught me a wonderful lesson. She taught me to care about others. I never really knew how useful that lesson would be until now. I think I really learned from the blueberry incident.

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  30. Mrs. Maxey~ because she is awesome and the BEST TEACHER EVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1
    Art~ because I can express myself. Their are no limits or rules to it!
    Domino~ He is my dog and he loves me and I love him
    Cookie~ She is my hamster and she is chubby
    Friends~ because they keep me company and make me laugh
    Sunsets~ Because they are beautiful<3
    Sugar~ Why not?!?!
    Key Time~ I get excited about it!
    Baking~ because it is fun
    Books~ because they’re fun to read

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  31. Mrs. Maxey~ because she is awesome and the BEST TEACHER EVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1
    Art~ because I can express myself. Their are no limits or rules to it!
    Domino~ He is my dog and he loves me and I love him
    Cookie~ She is my hamster and she is chubby
    Friends~ because they keep me company and make me laugh
    Sunsets~ Because they are beautiful<3
    Sugar~ Why not?!?!
    Key Time~ I get excited about it!
    Baking~ because it is fun
    Books~ because they’re fun to read

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  32. 10 Things That Make Me Happy

    Friends- I have fun with them, and it feels good to spend time with people.

    Dogs- they are fun to play with.

    Swimming- it's fun to do.

    Books- they give me knowledge.

    Drawing- it helps me be creative.

    Family- they teach me life.

    Frozen Yogurt- chocolate is the best.

    Colorado- is AWESOME!

    Outdoors- so fun to play in.

    Hiking- we bring my dog.


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  33. 10 Things that make me HAPPY!!!

    Basketball makes me think of fun!
    waffles make me feel like I’m in heaven.
    skateboarding makes me feel free.
    Animals make me feel so happy.
    Candy makes me go YAH!
    I love rollerblading when my hair blows in the wind.
    Family, when I see family they comfort me.
    snow and winter are the best times with hot coco.
    I love when it rains and rain hits the windows.
    Friends are the best they can have fun but they can also have serious talks.

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